Discussion:
"Ryoshuu" (Melancholy of Ex-Hometown)
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B. Ito
2003-10-30 03:13:45 UTC
Permalink
This was originally a foreign tune, for which a Japanese
wrote these lyrics.

I don't know at all if these lyrics are translations or not.
Anyway, the tune and the Japanese lyrics are very nice,
so I translated into Enlgish.

http://www5.tok2.com/home2/bito/Ryoshuu.htm

I appreciate very much any comments, suggestions and
corrections of my English.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
旅愁
Ryoshuu
Melancholy of Ex-Hometown No. 255
             
J.P.Ordway 作曲 ジェイ・ピー・オードウエイ:作曲
犬童球溪 作詞     Kendou Kyuukei(?): Sakushi


(1)
更け行く秋の夜 旅の空の
Fukeyuku aki no yo tabi no sora no

わびしき思いに ひとりなやむ
Wabishiki omoi ni hitori nayamu

恋しやふるさと なつかし父母
Koishi ya furusato natsukashi chichi-haha

夢路にたどるは 故郷の家路
Yumeji ni tadoru wa sato no ieji

更け行く秋の夜 旅の空の
Fukeyuku aki no yo tabi no sora no

わびしき思いに ひとりなやむ
Wabaishiki omoi ni hitori nayamu

(1)
Late a_t ni_ght in the autumn / du_ring my_ trip alo_ne,
I’ve been sufferin_g from the feelin_g / o_f empty sa_dne_ss
I miss so mu_ch my hometown_ / and my_ mo_m and dad there_.
Wha_t I see_ in_ my drea_ms / are_ old roa_ds back ho_me.
Late a_t ni_ght in the autumn / du_ring my_ trip alo_ne,
I’ve been sufferin_g from the feelin_g / o_f empty sa_dne_ss


(2)
窓うつ嵐に 夢もやぶれ
Mado-utsu arashi ni yume mo yabure

遙けきかなたに 心まよう
Harukeki kanata ni kokoro mayou

恋しやふるさと なつかし父母
Koishi ya furusato natsukashi chichi-haha

思いに浮かぶは 杜のこずえ
Omoi ni ukabu wa mori no kozue

窓うつ嵐に 夢もやぶれ
Mado-utsu arashi ni yume mo yabure

遙けきかなたに 心まよう
Harukeki kanata ni kokoro mayou

(2)
The_ stormy rai_n hits the window / and my_ dream-lo_st min_d.
My sou_l i_s just wanderin_g / somewhere_ ho_mewar__d.
I miss so mu_ch my hometown_ / and my_ mo_m and dad there_.
I_ remembe_r the beautiful tree-to_ps / in_ my ho_me country.
The stormy rai_n hits the window / and my_ dream-lo_st min_d.
My sou_l i_s just wanderin_g / somewhere_ ho_mewar__d.

2003. 10. 12, 12a, 30 Translated by: B. Ito

--------------------------------------------
--
B. Ito ***@wonder.ocn.ne.jp
My Vocal Samples (Enka Eigo Versions)
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Bart Mathias
2003-10-30 20:25:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by B. Ito
these lyrics.
I don't know at all if these lyrics are translations or not.
Anyway, the tune and the Japanese lyrics are very nice, so I
translated into Enlgish.
http://www5.tok2.com/home2/bito/Ryoshuu.htm
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Ryoshuu
Melancholy of Ex-Hometown No. 255
B!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!B
J.P.OrdwayB!!:n6JB
B%8%'%$!&%T!<!&%*!<%I%&%(%$!':n6JB
B8$F85e^d!!:n;l!!!!!!!!!!BKendou Kyuukei(?): Sakushi
We do this song sometimes in one of my `ukulele classes.

There is an English version on our sheet music, but fortunately we
sing it only in Japanese, because the English is pretty bad--it
*must* have been written by Kendou:

"Sorrow in a Journey"

(Come again? Why not just "Homesick"? How do you get *in* a
journey?)

"1. Deepening is the night in fall while in my journey's days,
Deep is the sorrow in my mind, it still abides and stays,
How I miss my home town I love, oh, my parents at home,
Often I see them in my dreams, I shall never roam!
Deepening in the night in fall while in my journey's days,
Deep in the sorrow in my mind, it still abides and stays."
[sic!]

If this stays wrapped right, it will be six lines, beginning
"Deepening, Deep, How, Often, Deepening, Deep."

(What in the world could "it" be, that in the last line still abides
and stays deep in the sorrow in my mind?)

Bart
B. Ito
2003-11-01 22:20:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bart Mathias
Post by B. Ito
these lyrics.
I don't know at all if these lyrics are translations or not.
Anyway, the tune and the Japanese lyrics are very nice, so I
translated into Enlgish.
http://www5.tok2.com/home2/bito/Ryoshuu.htm
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Ryoshuu
Melancholy of Ex-Hometown No. 255
B!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!B
J.P.OrdwayB!!:n6JB
B%8%'%$!&%T!<!&%*!<%I%&%(%$!':n6JB
B8$F85e^d!!:n;l!!!!!!!!!!BKendou Kyuukei(?): Sakushi
We do this song sometimes in one of my `ukulele classes.
There is an English version on our sheet music, but fortunately we
sing it only in Japanese, because the English is pretty bad--it
"Sorrow in a Journey"
(Come again? Why not just "Homesick"? How do you get *in* a
journey?)
"1. Deepening is the night in fall while in my journey's days,
Deep is the sorrow in my mind, it still abides and stays,
How I miss my home town I love, oh, my parents at home,
Often I see them in my dreams, I shall never roam!
Deepening in the night in fall while in my journey's days,
Deep in the sorrow in my mind, it still abides and stays."
[sic!]
If this stays wrapped right, it will be six lines, beginning
"Deepening, Deep, How, Often, Deepening, Deep."
(What in the world could "it" be, that in the last line still abides
and stays deep in the sorrow in my mind?)
Bart
--------------------------------------
I know you have been enjoying your ukulele class.
In your another topics' post "chopsticks", did you say somewhere
that you are now taking a piano lesson, too ? It sounds very nice
that you also play the piano.

What I can play is only the early part of the Japanese
"Neko Funjatta", not the "Kitten on the Keys" of the Confrey's.

Thank you for your introduction of English translations of "Ryoshuu."
I alos think the translations must have been made by Kendou or by
some other Japanese. "I shall never roam." in the fourth line doesn't
make sense, does it ?

I think only the rhyming of "days- stays" and "home-roam" are
very nice.

-----------------------
B. Ito
Bart Mathias
2003-11-02 01:28:23 UTC
Permalink
"B. Ito" writes:

"Bart Mathias" wrote a bunch of stuff that is irrelevant here.
Post by B. Ito
--------------------------------------
I know you have been enjoying your ukulele class. In your another
topics' post "chopsticks", did you say somewhere that you are now
taking a piano lesson, too ? It sounds very nice that you also
play the piano.
I took piano lessons from probably late 1945 until possibly fall of
1948.

Utterly lacking musical talent (except for the mental ability to
erase wrong notes and slow down or speed up time so that rhythm
doesn't suffer) I never really learned to play, although I have owned
two pianos and an electronic keyboard.

..

Bart
B. Ito
2003-11-02 07:04:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bart Mathias
"Bart Mathias" wrote a bunch of stuff that is irrelevant here.
Post by B. Ito
--------------------------------------
I know you have been enjoying your ukulele class. In your another
topics' post "chopsticks", did you say somewhere that you are now
taking a piano lesson, too ? It sounds very nice that you also
play the piano.
I took piano lessons from probably late 1945 until possibly fall of
1948.
Utterly lacking musical talent (except for the mental ability to
erase wrong notes and slow down or speed up time so that rhythm
doesn't suffer) I never really learned to play, although I have owned
two pianos and an electronic keyboard.
..
Bart
------------------------------------------
That was good that you experienced the piano lessons for almost
3 years in the past.

That means that you have the mental aiblity to trace correct notes and
the rhythm speed. That's also very good.

----------------------------------
B. Ito
Bart Mathias
2003-11-03 01:43:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bart Mathias
...
I took piano lessons from probably late 1945 until possibly fall of
1948.
... I never really learned to play, ...
Totally trivial and off-topic, but I can't stand the thought of
everybody whispering, "Three years of piano lessons and he never
learned to play? NObody is that devoid of talent!"

It was late 1946 after returning to California from Alabama or summer
of 1947. My grandmother gave me a piano and lessons belatedly for my
11th birthday or on time for my 12th. So it was only two years, or
maybe a year-and-a-half (this is what I remember).

Bart
Louise Bremner
2003-11-03 10:39:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bart Mathias
Post by Bart Mathias
I took piano lessons from probably late 1945 until possibly fall of
1948.
... I never really learned to play, ...
Totally trivial and off-topic, but I can't stand the thought of
everybody whispering, "Three years of piano lessons and he never
learned to play? NObody is that devoid of talent!"
<ulp> I must've had something like three years of piano lessons, but....

________________________________________________________________________
Louise Bremner (log at gol dot com)
If you want a reply by e-mail, don't write to my Yahoo address!
B. Ito
2003-11-03 11:05:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bart Mathias
Post by Bart Mathias
...
I took piano lessons from probably late 1945 until possibly fall of
1948.
... I never really learned to play, ...
Totally trivial and off-topic, but I can't stand the thought of
everybody whispering, "Three years of piano lessons and he never
learned to play? NObody is that devoid of talent!"
It was late 1946 after returning to California from Alabama or summer
of 1947. My grandmother gave me a piano and lessons belatedly for my
11th birthday or on time for my 12th. So it was only two years, or
maybe a year-and-a-half (this is what I remember).
Bart
--------------------------------------------
"A year-and-a-half" is in a sense a long enough for an actual experience
of piano lessons. It is a good experience.

In my case about 6 years ago I learned by myself how to play the Japanese
"Neko Funjatta" using, let's see...... 7 - 8 fingers (better than
"chopsticks"
style). However, in three years I forgot how to move my fingers and
restudied
by myself.

Of course I like the piano tones and I enjoy varying the intervals of each
tone
while you play the melody. In my case, this amusement has something to do
with my hobby of Morse wireless communication hobby, "Ton Tsuu" in Japanese.
"Ton" is short and Tsuu" is long, of courses.

--------------------------------------
B. Ito
Bart Mathias
2003-11-03 22:24:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by B. Ito
....
Of course I like the piano tones and I enjoy varying the intervals
of each tone while you play the melody. In my case, this amusement
has something to do with my hobby of Morse wireless communication
hobby, "Ton Tsuu" in Japanese. "Ton" is short and Tsuu" is long, of
courses.
That's why I love this NG. All these little things that I never even
noticed I didn't know, and you never know when one of them is going
to pop up here.

From now on I will hear "ton ton ton tsuu" when I think of Beethoven.

Tsuu ton ton ton ton tsuu ton tsuu ton tsuu
Don Kirkman
2003-11-04 00:56:51 UTC
Permalink
It seems to me I heard somewhere that Bart Mathias wrote in article
Post by Bart Mathias
Post by B. Ito
Of course I like the piano tones and I enjoy varying the intervals
of each tone while you play the melody. In my case, this amusement
has something to do with my hobby of Morse wireless communication
hobby, "Ton Tsuu" in Japanese. "Ton" is short and Tsuu" is long, of
courses.
That's why I love this NG. All these little things that I never even
noticed I didn't know, and you never know when one of them is going
to pop up here.
From now on I will hear "ton ton ton tsuu" when I think of Beethoven.
Tsuu ton ton ton ton tsuu ton tsuu ton tsuu
Much more musical than dahdididit didah didahdit dah. :-)

How did Beethoven happen to know International Morse Code, anyway? SFB
Morse's railway code was taps and spaces, not long and short tones.
--
Don
Old age is when you start saying "I wish I knew now what I knew then."
B. Ito
2003-11-04 22:55:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Kirkman
It seems to me I heard somewhere that Bart Mathias wrote in article
Post by Bart Mathias
Post by B. Ito
Of course I like the piano tones and I enjoy varying the intervals
of each tone while you play the melody. In my case, this amusement
has something to do with my hobby of Morse wireless communication
hobby, "Ton Tsuu" in Japanese. "Ton" is short and Tsuu" is long, of
courses.
That's why I love this NG. All these little things that I never even
noticed I didn't know, and you never know when one of them is going
to pop up here.
From now on I will hear "ton ton ton tsuu" when I think of Beethoven.
Tsuu ton ton ton ton tsuu ton tsuu ton tsuu
Much more musical than dahdididit didah didahdit dah. :-)
How did Beethoven happen to know International Morse Code, anyway? SFB
Morse's railway code was taps and spaces, not long and short tones.
--
Don
Old age is when you start saying "I wish I knew now what I knew then."
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In my hobby I had only some minutes of experiences of hearing and writing
down the "Railway Morse Codes." I think I can copy those tapping codes
about 90 percent correct.

-------------------------
B. Ito
Don Kirkman
2003-11-05 00:28:56 UTC
Permalink
It seems to me I heard somewhere that B. Ito wrote in article
Post by B. Ito
Post by Don Kirkman
It seems to me I heard somewhere that Bart Mathias wrote in article
Post by Bart Mathias
Post by B. Ito
Of course I like the piano tones and I enjoy varying the intervals
of each tone while you play the melody. In my case, this amusement
has something to do with my hobby of Morse wireless communication
hobby, "Ton Tsuu" in Japanese. "Ton" is short and Tsuu" is long, of
courses.
That's why I love this NG. All these little things that I never even
noticed I didn't know, and you never know when one of them is going
to pop up here.
From now on I will hear "ton ton ton tsuu" when I think of Beethoven.
Tsuu ton ton ton ton tsuu ton tsuu ton tsuu
Much more musical than dahdididit didah didahdit dah. :-)
How did Beethoven happen to know International Morse Code, anyway? SFB
Morse's railway code was taps and spaces, not long and short tones.
In my hobby I had only some minutes of experiences of hearing and writing
down the "Railway Morse Codes." I think I can copy those tapping codes
about 90 percent correct.
I've seen them in print but never practiced copying them, so I don't
know if the clacking sound in Western TV and movie scenes is accurate or
not. Bart may not believe this, but old as I am the International Morse
*was* in use by the time I was cognizant of such things.
--
Don
Old age is when you start saying "I wish I knew now what I knew then."
Bart Mathias
2003-11-06 03:49:32 UTC
Permalink
...
... Bart may not believe this, but old as I am the International
Morse *was* in use by the time I was cognizant of such things.
I've been wondering what became of Reuben, from Texas, who picked up
what he knew of Japanese in Okinawa. Wasn't he even older than you?

And maybe that guy at Washington State, Chris somebody, who was part
of the team behind the first Unix news reader (or was it e-mail) I
ever used back in the late '80s and early '90s was pretty old too.
"rm"?

And speaking of sljers of the past, where did Lei and Sho run off to?
Or the "Happa Foody" (Mona, was it?)? Did they get a life?

I know that's what happened to Al Harkcom and David Luke.

Just reminiscing, however that should be spelt.

Bart
Don Kirkman
2003-11-06 19:56:37 UTC
Permalink
It seems to me I heard somewhere that Bart Mathias wrote in article
Post by Bart Mathias
... Bart may not believe this, but old as I am the International
Morse *was* in use by the time I was cognizant of such things.
I've been wondering what became of Reuben, from Texas, who picked up
what he knew of Japanese in Okinawa. Wasn't he even older than you?
Yes, I think probably so--he alluded to his age from time to time.
Post by Bart Mathias
And maybe that guy at Washington State, Chris somebody, who was part
of the team behind the first Unix news reader (or was it e-mail) I
ever used back in the late '80s and early '90s was pretty old too.
"rm"?
And speaking of sljers of the past, where did Lei and Sho run off to?
Or the "Happa Foody" (Mona, was it?)? Did they get a life?
I know that's what happened to Al Harkcom and David Luke.
Just reminiscing, however that should be spelt.
Names that rise slowly out of the mists (Mysts?) that waft over the
quagmire that slj sometimes is. :-) To the extent I remember, I think
you have the names and the identifiers right. I have no idea what
happened to any of them; people just stop showing up one day and we're
left wondering. Somewhat reminiscent of real life, I guess.
--
Don
Old age is when you start saying "I wish I knew now what I knew then."
B. Ito
2003-11-04 22:54:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bart Mathias
Post by B. Ito
....
Of course I like the piano tones and I enjoy varying the intervals
of each tone while you play the melody. In my case, this amusement
has something to do with my hobby of Morse wireless communication
hobby, "Ton Tsuu" in Japanese. "Ton" is short and Tsuu" is long, of
courses.
That's why I love this NG. All these little things that I never even
noticed I didn't know, and you never know when one of them is going
to pop up here.
From now on I will hear "ton ton ton tsuu" when I think of Beethoven.
Tsuu ton ton ton ton tsuu ton tsuu ton tsuu
------------------------------------------------
This last line makes good sense.
The short tone is usually written like "ton" but colloquially it is
usually only "to" without "n."

So your name is:
Tsuu to to to to tsuu to tsuu to tsu
Tsuu tsuu to tsuu tsu to to to to to to to tsuu to to to

------------------------------------
B. Ito
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